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Stanley Lord

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'''Stanley Lord''' (September 13<sup>th</sup>, 1877 – January 24<sup>th</sup>, 1962) was captain of the ''[[SS Californian]]'', a ship that was in the vicinity of the ''RMS Titanic'' the night it sank on April 15<sup>th</sup>, 1912.
 
'''Stanley Lord''' (September 13<sup>th</sup>, 1877 – January 24<sup>th</sup>, 1962) was captain of the ''[[SS Californian]]'', a ship that was in the vicinity of the ''RMS Titanic'' the night it sank on April 15<sup>th</sup>, 1912.
   
==Biography==
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==Early life==
===Early life===
 
 
Lord was born on September 13<sup>th</sup>, 1877 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. He began his training at sea when he was thirteen, aboard the Braque ''Naiad'', in March 1891. He later obtained his Second Mate’s Certificate of competency and served as Second Officer in the Braque ''Lurlei''.
 
Lord was born on September 13<sup>th</sup>, 1877 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. He began his training at sea when he was thirteen, aboard the Braque ''Naiad'', in March 1891. He later obtained his Second Mate’s Certificate of competency and served as Second Officer in the Braque ''Lurlei''.
   
In February 1901, at the age of 23, Lord obtained his Master's Certificate, and three months later, obtained his Extra Master’s Certificate. He entered the service of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company in 1897. The company was taken over by the Leyland Line in 1900, but Lord continued service with the new company, and was awarded his first command in 1906.<ref>[http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/biography/2459/ Captain Stanley Lord - Titanic Biographies - Encyclopedia Titanica<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref>
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In February 1901, at the age of 23, Lord obtained his Master's Certificate, and three months later, obtained his Extra Master’s Certificate. He entered the service of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company in 1897. The company was taken over by the Leyland Line in 1900, but Lord continued service with the new company, and was awarded his first command in 1906.<ref>[http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/biography/2459/ Captain Stanley Lord - Titanic Biographies - Encyclopedia Titanica<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref>
   
 
Lord was given full command of the ''SS Californian'' in 1911.
 
Lord was given full command of the ''SS Californian'' in 1911.
   
===Before the disaster===
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==Before the disaster==
 
On the night of April 14<sup>th</sup>, 1912; as the ''Californian'' approached a large ice field, Captain Lord decided to stop around 10:21 PM and wait out the night. Before turning in for the night, he ordered his sole wireless operator, [[Cyril Furmstone Evans|Cyril Evans]], to warn other ships in the area about the ice. When reaching the ''Titanic'', Evans tapped out "I say old man, we are stopped and surrounded by ice." The ''Californian'' was so close to the ''Titanic'' that the message was very loud in the ears of ''Titanic'' First Wireless Operator [[Jack Phillips]], who angrily replied "Shut up! Shut up! I am busy. I am working Cape Race." Earlier in the day the wireless equipment aboard the ''Titanic'' had broken down and Phillips, along with Second Wireless Operator [[Harold Bride]], had spent the better part of the day trying to repair it. Now they were swamped with outgoing messages that had piled up during the day. Phillips was exhausted after such a long day. Evans listened in for a while longer as Phillips sent routine traffic through the Cape Race relaying station before finally turning in for bed after a very long day at around 11:30 PM.
 
On the night of April 14<sup>th</sup>, 1912; as the ''Californian'' approached a large ice field, Captain Lord decided to stop around 10:21 PM and wait out the night. Before turning in for the night, he ordered his sole wireless operator, [[Cyril Furmstone Evans|Cyril Evans]], to warn other ships in the area about the ice. When reaching the ''Titanic'', Evans tapped out "I say old man, we are stopped and surrounded by ice." The ''Californian'' was so close to the ''Titanic'' that the message was very loud in the ears of ''Titanic'' First Wireless Operator [[Jack Phillips]], who angrily replied "Shut up! Shut up! I am busy. I am working Cape Race." Earlier in the day the wireless equipment aboard the ''Titanic'' had broken down and Phillips, along with Second Wireless Operator [[Harold Bride]], had spent the better part of the day trying to repair it. Now they were swamped with outgoing messages that had piled up during the day. Phillips was exhausted after such a long day. Evans listened in for a while longer as Phillips sent routine traffic through the Cape Race relaying station before finally turning in for bed after a very long day at around 11:30 PM.
   
===During the night===
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==During the night==
 
Over the course of the night, various officers and seamen on the deck of ''Leyland Liner Californian'' witnessed white rockets being fired into the air over a strange ship off in the distance, totaling eight in all.
 
Over the course of the night, various officers and seamen on the deck of ''Leyland Liner Californian'' witnessed white rockets being fired into the air over a strange ship off in the distance, totaling eight in all.
   
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Throughout the night, no one on board the ''Californian'' attempted to wake their wireless operator, and ask him to contact the ship to ask why they were firing rockets and trying to signal them, until 5:30 AM. By then however it was too late— the Titanic had gone down at 2:20. When she had slipped below the water, the sudden disappearance of lights was interpreted by the ''Californian'' crew as the other liner steaming on her way.
 
Throughout the night, no one on board the ''Californian'' attempted to wake their wireless operator, and ask him to contact the ship to ask why they were firing rockets and trying to signal them, until 5:30 AM. By then however it was too late— the Titanic had gone down at 2:20. When she had slipped below the water, the sudden disappearance of lights was interpreted by the ''Californian'' crew as the other liner steaming on her way.
   
===Search and recovery===
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==Search and recovery==
 
On Monday morning, Captain Lord was notified by the ''Frankfurt'' that the ''Titanic'' had gone down early that morning. At 5:45 that morning, the ''Californian'' pulled up alongside the ''[[RMS Carpathia|Carpathia]]'' and stayed behind to search for additional bodies after the ''Carpathia'' steamed towards New York.
 
On Monday morning, Captain Lord was notified by the ''Frankfurt'' that the ''Titanic'' had gone down early that morning. At 5:45 that morning, the ''Californian'' pulled up alongside the ''[[RMS Carpathia|Carpathia]]'' and stayed behind to search for additional bodies after the ''Carpathia'' steamed towards New York.
   
===Reputation===
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== Reputation ==
 
Lord was dismissed by the Leyland Line in August of the same year. So far as any negligence of the SS ''Californian''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s officers and crew was concerned, the conclusions of both the United States Inquiry and the British Inquiry seemed to disapprove of the actions of Captain Lord but stopped short of recommending charges. While both Inquiries censured the S.S. ''Californian'', they did not directly censure the individuals who were on the ship.
 
Lord was dismissed by the Leyland Line in August of the same year. So far as any negligence of the SS ''Californian''<nowiki>'</nowiki>s officers and crew was concerned, the conclusions of both the United States Inquiry and the British Inquiry seemed to disapprove of the actions of Captain Lord but stopped short of recommending charges. While both Inquiries censured the S.S. ''Californian'', they did not directly censure the individuals who were on the ship.
   
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Maritime Historian, Daniel Allen Butler, in his 2009 book ''The Other Side of Night: The Carpathia, the Californian, and the night Titanic was Lost'' alleges that Captain Lord's personality and temperament — his behaviour at both inquiries, his threatening of his crew, his frequent changing of his story, lying under oath at both inquiries, the absence of the scrap log book, and an odd remark made by Lord in Boston in a newspaper interview: ''"It is all foolishness for anybody to say that I, at the point of a revolver, took any man into this room and made him swear to tell any kind of story."'' - point to Lord's having some sort of mental illness. His lack of compassion — never once expressing grief at the loss of ''Titanic'' or sorrow for those who had lost family when she sank, is, claims Butler, a diagnosis of Sociopathy. <ref>Butler, Daniel Allen; Epilogue: Flotsam and Jetsam; "The Other Side of Night: The Carpathia, the Californian, and the night Titanic was Lost"</ref>
 
Maritime Historian, Daniel Allen Butler, in his 2009 book ''The Other Side of Night: The Carpathia, the Californian, and the night Titanic was Lost'' alleges that Captain Lord's personality and temperament — his behaviour at both inquiries, his threatening of his crew, his frequent changing of his story, lying under oath at both inquiries, the absence of the scrap log book, and an odd remark made by Lord in Boston in a newspaper interview: ''"It is all foolishness for anybody to say that I, at the point of a revolver, took any man into this room and made him swear to tell any kind of story."'' - point to Lord's having some sort of mental illness. His lack of compassion — never once expressing grief at the loss of ''Titanic'' or sorrow for those who had lost family when she sank, is, claims Butler, a diagnosis of Sociopathy. <ref>Butler, Daniel Allen; Epilogue: Flotsam and Jetsam; "The Other Side of Night: The Carpathia, the Californian, and the night Titanic was Lost"</ref>
   
===Death===
 
 
Captain Lord died on January 24<sup>th</sup>, 1962; aged 84, almost half a century after the sinking of the ''Titanic''. He is buried in Wallasey Cemetery, Merseyside.
 
Captain Lord died on January 24<sup>th</sup>, 1962; aged 84, almost half a century after the sinking of the ''Titanic''. He is buried in Wallasey Cemetery, Merseyside.
   
===Legacy===
 
 
In "101 Things You Thought You Knew About the Titanic...But Didn't" authors Tim Maltin and Eloise Aston attribute Captain Lord's belief that the nearby ship was not the Titanic to cold-water mirages.
 
In "101 Things You Thought You Knew About the Titanic...But Didn't" authors Tim Maltin and Eloise Aston attribute Captain Lord's belief that the nearby ship was not the Titanic to cold-water mirages.
   
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